NCCLF Sponsoring March 2017 Rural Justice Summit

California’s Central Valley was transformed long ago into the nation’s most economically productive and intensive industrial agricultural region. Today, it produces more than half of the fruits, nuts, and vegetables consumed in America. While the Central Valley’s agricultural industry is critical to meeting US food need, it comes at a significant price to local residents. The political decisions made, and infrastructure supported, influence the environmental, social, and economic impacts faced by local residents, food workers, and businesses.

NCCLF Consulting and Lending supports Restore Oakland, innovative economics and restorative justice hub in East Oakland

The Ella Baker Center for Human Rights (EBC) and Restaurants Opportunities Centers United (ROC United) have joined forces to develop and launch a replicable and innovative restorative economics and restorative justice hub in East Oakland. Restore Oakland was developed to address two broken systems negatively impacting low-income communities of color in America: the disproportionate rate of incarceration and the lack of upward economic mobility within the restaurant industry.

NCCLF awards grant to People’s Community Market in West Oakland

West Oakland’s growing and changing community is comprised predominantly of low-income Latino and African American residents with little access to nearby food retail. This forces residents to collectively spend more than $58 million annually on groceries outside of their own community. For low-income residents with little or no access to transportation, buying groceries is an increased challenge and results in community members doing their shopping at local convenience stores with little access to affordable, high quality fresh foods. As a result of this, diet-related, preventable chronic diseases are on the rise in the neighborhood.

Clovis Culinary Center Opening in Late 2016 to Support Food Entrepreneurship

Despite being in the country’s most productive agricultural region, communities in the San Joaquin Valley experience very high rates of poverty and unemployment and too often lack access to healthy foods. Though small-scale food entrepreneurship is rare in the area, those who are trying to start or expand a business face difficulty in complying with State

Oakland Community Park plans ahead with support of Community Catalyst Predevelopment Funds

Nestled in the heart of Oakland’s Fruitvale neighborhood, the six-acre Peralta Hacienda Historical Park provides youth and families with a space to connect, build community, and celebrate their heritage. The park, once the headquarters of a 45,000-acre cattle ranch of the Peralta family, contains a historic house museum, a multipurpose activity center, community gardens, outdoor exhibit areas, and a special nature area along Peralta Creek.